Different but better – applying a growth mindset to Covid-19

May 18, 2020

“Different but better” – applying a growth mindset to life post Covid  

As humans, we dislike change. Fact.  

This naturally comes from the side effects of change, usually being feelings of uncertainty and hopelessness.  

However, as a wise person somewhere once said: “The only consistent thing in life is change”. 

Taking this into consideration, it would probably do us all some good to think about the best perspective to have on change. Ideally, leading to us being more accepting of whatever circumstance we find ourselves in, and hopefully not letting negative feelings get on top of us. 

A model frequently used to explain how we experience change is the SARAH change model. Moving through its stages as follows… 

Shock, Anger, Resistance, Acceptance, Healing. 

The majority of us will go through all of these stages, however our mindset and perspective can move us towards ‘healing’ that little bit faster.  

Performance psychologist, Dr Dave Alred, has an interesting perspective on managing change that is applicable to many of our circumstances as we make our way through the Covid-19 pandemic.  

He addresses the common resistance of ‘wanting things back to how they once were’ by shooting it down. 

Why would you want things to be back to how they were, when they could be better? 

He sees that perspective or self-limiting ideology as one that clashes with the growth mindset and limits our own personal growth, preventing us from looking forward towards new goals and ambitions. 

Common examples of this are office workers that now have the ability to work remotely. Some may have made being fit and healthy a priority in their day to day life. Others will have improved relationships or got in contact with old friends.  

If you take anything from Dr Alreds’ message, make it this… 

“Wherever you are and whoever you are, you can always get better. But that doesn’t imply that there’s fault with what you are doing at the moment. It’s just never ever too late to improve.” 

← Back to blog page